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Internet Backs Babysitter Who Called the Cops After Mom Didn’t Come Home

A babysitter who called the cops after the mom didn’t come at the agreed time, and was unreachable, has received widespread support online.

The 28-year-old shared a post to Reddit as she debated if she did the right thing, explaining the mom had a history of being flaky. The dilemma, shared on Wednesday, has been upvoted more than 20,000 times, and sparked a fierce debate.

Posting under Electronic_Professor to the site’s Am I The A****** forum, the woman, thought to be in the U.S., revealed she babysat on weekends to “make extra cash.”

Explaining the dilemma with the mom, who she worked for for about a year, she wrote: “My issue is, the mom is never home on time. She used to not give me return times but finally I started asking as it made it impossible to get anything done on the weekends. I’d go babysit so she could go to ‘brunch’ but she’d be gone from 11 AM to 7 PM. My whole day was gone. After that, she’d start giving me times but never stick to them. She wouldn’t even call to tell me, she’d just stay out.”

The babysitter agreed to watch the kids, aged 3 and 7, on a Saturday night from 6 p.m., with the understanding the mom would be home by 9 p.m., as she had plans later on.

But the evening didn’t go as planned, as she explained: “Of course, 9:00 rolls around and she’s not home. I call her, no response. Text, no response. Another hour. Nothing. Still calling and texting. Finally, it is midnight. By this point, my plans are long ruined but I’m pissed and exhausted. I call her and leave a voicemail saying if she’s not home in the next hour, I’m considering the kids abandoned and calling the cops.

“I also text her this. I try calling her 30 minutes later and it goes to voicemail on the second ring, I text her again and she leaves me on read. If she had reached out saying ‘Hey, I’m staying out until x time,’ I would’ve stayed. I don’t know any of her family nor the father of the kids so I can’t call them.”

Sticking to her ultimatum, she called the cops while the kids were sleeping.

“I gave her a grace period of 15 minutes and tried calling again, finally called the cops (non-emergency line). They showed up and I showed our agreement in text from earlier in the week confirming that she’d be home by 9. They try contacting her, didn’t answer. I was dismissed and they took the children to the police station. I go home and go to bed,” she said.

She says she was awoken in the early hours by the mom, after returning home and demanding to know where she and the kids were.

The babysitter continued: “I am awoken at 3 AM by a frantic call. It’s her. Where are the kids? Why am I not here? I

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T-Mobile Charts Out Better Home Internet Options

T-Mobile’s home internet service provides a big boost for people in areas where they’re otherwise stuck with lackluster cable or DSL, but it could use some upgrades. In a conversation with PCMag, T-Mobile’s President of Technology Neville Ray mused about how the system could be improved in the future.

“There’s way more demand for this product than we imagined. Its performance is pretty strong, and its price point is great, and folks hate their cable companies,” Ray says.

I reviewed T-Mobile Home Internet in June, and I found its weakest point to be its Nokia home modem. My first unit failed, and I needed a replacement. Several commenters on my review agree: they say the modem is unreliable and they’ve often needed replacements.

“We’re absolutely expanding the number of vendor solutions that will be available,” Ray says, pointing out that when the service first launched, “we didn’t have a ton of choice.”

The Nokia modem also has no easy option to add an external antenna, which could really improve signal strength. (You can in fact add one, but it takes some hardware hacking.) Ray says that T-Mobile was extremely focused on ease of use at the beginning of its rollout, but it’s now trying to see how it can offer more flexible solutions.

He didn’t give any time frame for offering more options; he was just pointing out that T-Mobile is thinking about them. “We didn’t want to have to do the Verizon thing of sticking it up in the window,” he says. “We’re trying to avoid inconveniencing the consumer with truck rolls and that sort of thing. We need something…that most average consumers can deploy quickly.”

Even without extending coverage further, though, T-Mobile is pretty thrilled about the demand it’s seeing. While Verizon has taken three years to get to 150,000 wireless home subscribers, T-Mobile is aiming for 500,000 by the end of this year, the company has previously said.

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According to our review, T-Mobile’s now-$50/month home internet service offered me speeds between 150-300Mbps with no contract, installation, or equipment fees. That’s better than DSL, on par with cable, and not as good as fiber. Coverage for the best speeds is reliant on T-Mobile’s mid-band 5G network, which now covers about 185 million people.

T-Mobile has plenty of capacity on its mid-band network for more signups, and won’t need to dip into its cache of millimeter-wave spectrum soon, Ray says.

“The volume of capacity we’re generating with that mid-band deployment, and our ability to start extending the reach and availability of that 5G home router product, that’s pretty immense over the next two or three years,” he says.

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